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Alcoholism: A Matter of Choice A Twenty-First Century View of Addiction by Jim Hewitt

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Published by Schenkman Books .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Substance Abuse & Addictions - General,
  • Alcoholism (Psychiatric Aspects),
  • Psychology,
  • Substance Abuse & Addictions - Alcoholism,
  • Compulsive behavior,
  • Psychopathology - Addiction,
  • Alcoholism

Book details:

The Physical Object
FormatHardcover
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL8343567M
ISBN 100870471074
ISBN 109780870471070

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  With some, it may encourage helplessness and their sense of responsibility. Whether the belief is that it is a brain disease or a choice, the addict must take steps to control and stop the addiction. If addiction is a disease, it can be compared to other diseases such as diabetes, heart disease, or cancer.   This book is short in absolute terms (well short of pages) but at times it takes a sufficiently slow pace in order to present data and facts as tightly as possible, so as to convince the reader that: drug addiction is a matter of the individual making ultimately irrational and harmful deicisions based on a mode of thinking that does not Cited by: Some Agreement I’ve Found From Addiction Researchers (added 6/10/14) I began working out my understanding of the brain disease model back in as I started working on a book about addiction; published this article in ; and was happy to find in when I went back to work with Baldwin Research that they had arrived at a similar conclusion.   No matter what the activity, whether cerebral or simply athletic, all have found "better things to do than drugs." Addiction: A Disorder of Choice, by .

  In fact, some researchers cite experiments that they say prove that addiction is a matter of choice. In Canada, researchers gave rats held in two different environments a choice . Research has shown that alcoholism is a choice, not a disease, and stripping alcohol abusers of their choice, by applying the disease concept, is a threat to the health of the individual. The disease concept oozes into every crevice of our society perpetuating harmful misinformation that hurts the very people it was intended to help.   In a book sure to inspire controversy, Gene Heyman argues that conventional wisdom about addiction -- that it is a disease, a compulsion beyond conscious control -- is wrong. At the heart of Heyman's analysis is a startling view of choice and motivation that applies to all choices, not just the choice to use drugs. Heyman's analysis of well-established but frequently ignored research leads to.   In the early phase of addiction, using drugs and alcohol can simply be fun; or it can be a form of self-medication that quells persistent self-loathing, anxiety, alienation, and loneliness.

Drug or alcohol addiction is not a disease, says Harvard psychologist, but a matter of free will. The title of your new book, Addiction: A Disorder of Choice, is more or less self-explanatory. Get this from a library! Alcoholism: a matter of choice: a twenty-first century view of addiction. [Jim Hewitt] -- In the flood of books and papers about alcoholism published since the s, no one has successfully explained the origin of alcoholic or addictive behavior. By applying modern psychological and.   But, everyone has a choice to take that first drink, or pop that first pill. And, every day, people make the choice to stop.” The Heavy Weight of Public Opinion. When it’s all said and done, the addiction debate rages on among policy makers, physicians and the public. No matter which side you take in the end, it’s clear that something has. This book is in opposition of the disease model of addiction. In "Addiction is a Choice" r presents a common sense approach to addiction. He does so in a scientific manner, citing various studies throughout. It's my belief that this book, when partnered with the right therapist or other support system, can serve as a source of s: